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PinkMonkey.com Digital Library - PinkMonkey.com-Walden by Henry David Thoreau


Plowing, harrowing, and furrowing............. 7.50 (Too much.)

Beans for seed.............................................. 3.12 1/2

Potatoes for seed...................................................... 1.33

Peas for seed........................................................... 0.40

Turnip seed............................................................. 0.06

White line for crow fence....................................... 0.02

Horse cultivator and boy three hours...................... 1.00

Horse and cart to get crop...................................... 0.75

-----

In all.....................................................................$ 14.72 1/2

My income was (patremfamilias vendacem, non emacem esse
oportet), from

Nine bushels and twelve quarts of beans sold......$ 16.94

Five bushels large potatoes..................................... 2.50

Nine bushels small potatoes.................................... 2.25

Grass....................................................................... 1.00

Stalks...................................................................... 0.75 ----In
all.......................................................................$ 23.44

Leaving a pecuniary profit,

as I have elsewhere said, of...................................$ 8.71 1/2

This is the result of my experience in raising beans: Plant the
common small white bush bean about the first of June, in rows three
feet by eighteen inches apart, being careful to select fresh round and
unmixed seed. First look out for worms, and supply vacancies by
planting anew. Then look out for woodchucks, if it is an exposed
place, for they will nibble off the earliest tender leaves almost clean
as they go; and again, when the young tendrils make their
appearance, they have notice of it, and will shear them off with both
buds and young pods, sitting erect like a squirrel. But above all
harvest as early as possible, if you would escape frosts and have a
fair and salable crop; you may save much loss by this means.

This further experience also I gained: I said to myself, I will not
plant beans and corn with so much industry another summer, but
such seeds, if the seed is not lost, as sincerity, truth, simplicity, faith,
innocence, and the like, and see if they will not grow in this soil,
even with less toil and manurance, and sustain me, for surely it has
not been exhausted for these crops. Alas! I said this to myself; but
now another summer is gone, and another, and another, and I am
obliged to say to you, Reader, that the seeds which I planted, if
indeed they were the seeds of those virtues, were wormeaten or had
lost their vitality, and so did not come up. Commonly men will only
be brave as their fathers were brave, or timid. This generation is very
sure to plant corn and beans each new year precisely as the Indians
did centuries ago and taught the first settlers to do, as if there were a
fate in it. I saw an old man the other day, to my astonishment,
making the holes with a hoe for the seventieth time at least, and not
for himself to lie down in! But why should not the New Englander
try new adventures, and not lay so much stress on his grain, his
potato and grass crop, and his orchards-raise other crops than these?
Why concern ourselves so much about our beans for seed, and not be
concerned at all about a new generation of men? We should really be
fed and cheered if when we met a man we were sure to see that some
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PinkMonkey.com Digital Library - PinkMonkey.com-Walden by Henry David Thoreau



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