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MonkeyNotes-King Henry VI, Part 3 by William Shakespeare
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Act IV, SCENE 1

Back at the palace in London, Richard, George, Somerset and
Montague enter. Richard asks his brother George whether the
marriage of Edward to Lady Grey is worthy or not. George says
that Edward could have waited for Warwick's return from France.
The King enters with Lady Grey as Queen, plus Pembroke,
Stafford and Hastings. Both George and Richard expresses their
dissatisfaction over the marriage, revealing their different reasons,
but Edward asserts that his authority as king allows him the
freedom to do what he wishes. For every reason they give that it
was a poor decision, Richard rejoins with a haughty declaration.
The Queen is somewhat taken aback by this exchange and reveals
that she is disturbed that her brothers-in-law do not support her as
Queen.

A postman comes to deliver news from King Lewis that reveals his
anger over Edward's recent decision and notification of pending
invasion by French troops. The postman also conveys Bona's
sarcastic message as well as Queen Margaret's. To each of these
rejoinders, King Edward replies flippantly. Warwick has also sent
notice that Edward has done him wrong and he and Margaret are
now closely allied. Hearing about the marriage between Warwick's
daughter and the Prince, George says he is going to marry
Warwick's other daughter. It is only Richard, who although
displeased with the turn of events, refuses to show his disloyalty.

With both Clarence and Somerset decamping, Edward realizes that
he should prepare for war in haste and asks Pembroke and Stafford
to go and make the preparations. He is happy to hear that
Montague, Hastings and Richard will stand by him and becomes
assured of victory.

Notes

Back in London, the house of York is in upheaval over Edward's
marriage to Lady Grey. All fear that serious repercussions will
occur because of his rash decision. Not only that, but Edward has
been very indiscreet by marrying off an heiress to his new wife's
son rather than George. This makes for tension between the
brothers. Therefore, the tension is rife not only between countries
but also family.

Richard also speaks out his mind but not so openly as George.

'No God forfrend that I should wish them serv'd
Whom God hath join'd them and were pity
To sunder them that yoke so well together.'

Richard is ironically citing the Scriptures for his purpose. He loves
the crown more than Edward and will wait for the golden
opportunity to come. But he also says that his brother has offended
him by giving the heir and daughter of Lord Scales to the brother
of his loving bride in marriage, when he was a bachelor. 'But in
your bride you bury brotherhood,' By this he means that after
marriage, Edward seems to have forgotten his loyalties to his
brothers who were closely associated with him before. He seems to
be interested only in the affairs of his bride's people.

Rather than fighting between the Lancastrians and Yorkists, here
the affiliations become more muddled as each man vies for power
and will go to any means to get it. Clarence is angry enough to
abandon his family and seek out Warwick while Richard brews
over how to acquire the crown. A few supporters of Edward chime
in to uphold what he has done, but even Edward is arrogant and
self-congratulatory as he fends off this counterattack. He claims
that he is in the right and that he can will his subjects to follow
him.When the post man delivers the message from the French
king, Lady Bona and Warwick and Queen Margaret, Edward is
shocked and enraged. He calls Warwick a traitor when he himself
has followed his morally debased principles rather than thinking of
the good of all. Suddenly he becomes concerned about the threat of
war.

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MonkeyNotes-King Henry VI, Part 3 by William Shakespeare
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