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MonkeyNotes-King Henry VI, Part 3 by William Shakespeare
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Act IV, Scene 3

The scene is Edward's camp near Warwick. Three watchmen enter
to guard the King's tent. From the conversation between the men
the audience finds out that Edward has made a solemn vow never
to take rest until Warwick or he is suppressed. They also say that
the King's chief friend Lord Hastings is also in the tent with the
King. Warwick, George, Oxford, Somerset and soldiers enters and
the King's tent is visible to them. They enter the tent suddenly and
bring out the King in his gown and Richard and Hastings run
away. Warwick addresses Edward as Duke of York again.
Warwick condemns Edward as a ruler who does not know how to
use ambassadors, how to be contented with one wife, how to use
brothers, how to work for the welfare of his people and how to
defend oneself from enemies. Edward replies that in spite of all his
incapability and vices, he will always be a king to himself even
though fortune overthrows him, and his mind will always exceed
the passage of the wheel of fortune. Warwick takes away the
crown from his head and says he shall put the crown back on
Henry's head. He asks Somerset to go and inform Prince Edward
and the Archbishop of York. He bids them farewell and goes out to
fight with Pembroke and his fellows. He tells Oxford that they
have to do is too free Henry from imprisonment and see that he is
seated in the regal throne.

Notes:

This short scene exposes the fall of Edward. Warwick and Oxford
with his French soldiers capture him outright from the tent and
assault him. Warwick takes away the crown forcibly from his head
and says that it belongs to King Henry who is the real owner of it.
Edward is demoted from the position of a king to a Duke. Warwick
condemns him as a man inefficient to be a ruler who does not
know how to use ambassadors, how to be contente with one wife,
how to treat brothers brotherly and how to work for the welfare of
his people. This gives an account of the true nature of Edward, his
inefficiency as a ruler, his lustful nature and weakness for women,
his burial of brotherhood and self-centered nature. But even at the
time of defeat, Edward maintains his calm posture and says that
even if fortune will overthrow him, his mind shall exceed the
passage of the wheel of fortune. This shows his adamant, arrogant
and proud nature.

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MonkeyNotes-King Henry VI, Part 3 by William Shakespeare
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