free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Main Street by Sinclair Lewis
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Notes

In this chapter is a photographic description of the spring. It is colorful and cheers the heart of Carol. The thick green grass and the yellow buttercups and the pasque flowers and the flowers and the red kinnkinic branches fill her heart with exhilaration. She dares to run and laugh aloud. She is convinced that the woodland Gods are still alive. She proclaims that she does not care for the Thanatopsises. Bjornstam who is on his way to his horse trading trip tempts her to join him with visions of camping out in the open country and touring through mountains and pine woods. She remarks that she may join him some day. Though she feels a little lonely after leaving him, she feels happy enough to swing into the Main Street.

The respect shown to Kennicott by the farmers thrills her. She too admires him. She is enchanted by the larks, the golden setting sun and the sea of wheat fields. The unbearable heat of the July brings Carol, the compensation of outdoor life in the cottages near Lake Minniemashie. With very few comforts of the town they go back to the pioneer days of living. All the ladies spend their time in minding the children, bathing and cooking. Carol feels relieved to know that she did not expect bookish conversations alone. She mixes naturally with them. She likes Juanita Haydock and Maud Dyer while helping them in preparing supper. She feels contented with life. But once they are back in the town the women go back to their proper and prim ways. Carolís efforts to get them outdoors are in vain. Once again, much to Carolís dismay the rounds of parties and petty jealousies begins.


Carolís dreams of having a salon where she would entertain educated company are realized only partially because the group she could hope to invite to her salon is very limited. Kennicott prefers the company of Sam Clark. Vida and Guy Pollock discuss Raymie Wutherspoon. Carol then diverts herself by reading the history of the pioneering days of Gopher Prairie. She feels enchanted by the account of the rugged life and believes that Champ Perry and his wife can reveal to her the secret of the simple life and show her the way to bring back that simplicity to Gopher Prairie. She is of the opinion that the town left behind its simplicity but failed to acquire the sophistication of the cities. She believes that the return to the past will cure Gopher Prairie and the entire country of all its ills.

Carol finds the flat of the Perrys full of their old furniture. She observes the makeshift arrangements with a tender heart. She feels at home with the Perrys and listens to their ideas eagerly and is thoroughly disappointed to find them to be so provincial. They denounce science and socialism. They feel that the farmers expect too much for their wheat. At the same time they complain that the elevator company owners expect too much work for the salary they pay. They feel that people who drink wine would go to hell. Whatever they can afford to do is considered to be virtuous and what they can not afford is considered to be wickedness. Carol keeps nodding her head out of politeness. She wishes to escape from them and when she leaves their house she forgets them and their ideas completely.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Main Street by Sinclair Lewis
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright © PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 9:53:08 AM