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PinkMonkey.com-MonkeyNotes-The Picture of Dorian Grey, by Oscar Wilde


PinkMonkey® Quotations on . . .

The Picture of Dorian Grey

By Oscar Wilde QUOTATION: Anybody can be good in the country. There are no temptations there.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 19 (1891).

QUOTATION: Men marry because they are tired; women, because they are curious; both are disappointed.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 4 (1891).

QUOTATION: What a fuss people make about fidelity! Why, even in love it is purely a question for physiology. It has nothing to do with our own will. Young men want to be faithful, and are not; old men want to be faithless, and cannot: that is all one can say.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 2 (1891).

QUOTATION: It is perfectly monstrous the way people go about nowadays saying things against one behind one’s back that are absolutely and entirely true.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).

QUOTATION: There are only two kinds of people who are really fascinating—people who know absolutely everything, and people who know absolutely nothing.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 7 (1891).

QUOTATION: The basis of optimism is sheer terror.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 6 (1891).

QUOTATION: I can’t help detesting my relations. I suppose it comes from the fact that none of us can stand other people having the same faults as ourselves.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).

QUOTATION: Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 2 (1891).

QUOTATION: Murder is always a mistake. One should never do anything that one cannot talk about after dinner.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 19 (1891).

QUOTATION: The advantage of the emotions is that they lead us astray.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).

QUOTATION: When one is in love, one always begins by deceiving one’s self, and one always ends by deceiving others. That is what the world calls a romance.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 4 (1891).

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